Wisdom for Your Weekend is your regular installment of what we’ve been reading (and watching) around the web. Presented to you by Chris Pappalardo, with guidance from Pastor J.D., this is our attempt to reflect Proverbs 9:9: “Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be still wiser; teach a righteous man, and he will increase in learning.” While we do not always agree with everything these authors post, we share these resources because we find them challenging and enriching. As we often say around the Summit, when it comes to reading, “Eat the fish and spit out the bones.”

Articles of the Week

The Six Forms of Media Bias, David Leonhardt, NY Times. I’m sure you’ve heard—perhaps often—that the media is biased. But I’ll bet you’ve heard that from different people, each of whom was frustrated at a different kind of bias. Leonhardt—a media man himself—shows why that’s the case: Media bias isn’t just one thing. It takes different forms. Identifying which bias is at play can go a long way in helping you cope with today’s (and tomorrow’s) avalanche of news.

The Five Most Important Decisions of Your Day, David Murray. I’ve heard it said that your destination in life is not about the big dreams you dream, but about the small decisions you make. And what’s true over the course of a lifetime is true in the microcosm of any one day, too. Make the right decisions at critical junctures of your day, and you’ll find healthier habits following. Miss these key junctures, and you’ll find yourself spiraling into bad habits—or worse, into flagrant sin. (Side note: I find it helpful to remember that Murray has a Scottish accent. If you try to hear that as you read this, it sounds that much more insightful.)

Two Questions to Ask Before You Quote Someone, Chris Hulshof. Quoting can be a surprisingly tricky business. While misattributions can be harmless, sometimes they can mislead and even put an authority behind your words that is not warranted. Even worse, if the comment blows up in your face (as it has ours), a misattribution can damage someone’s reputation. Don’t be part of the #fakenews problem. Before you send that tweet, do a little legwork and make sure that C.S. Lewis actually said that.

Move Over, Sex and Drugs. Ease Is the New Vice, Jen Pollock Michel. It’s startling, but true: Young people are not having sex outside of marriage as early or as often. That’s good news, right? Well, maybe. But it also follows a societal trend against all things bodily. In other words, kids aren’t refraining from sex because they think it’s wrong, but because it’s not easy enough. And this addiction to ease infects all of us in ways we hardly notice. If we are to be people following the incarnate Christ, however, we must learn how to love in tangible, uncomfortable, taxing ways.

Reading When You’re Really Busy, Trevin Wax. Whether you read a lot or hardly read at all, chances are you’d like more time to read. So, how can you make it happen, I mean really happen, amidst the craziness that is your uber-busy life? Trevin’s got four tips that I heartily recommend. (#4 is best of all.)

On the Lighter Side

NFL 2019, Bad Lip Reading. How can I even pick the best line? Maybe it’s, “My grief has a scent … like suffering.” Or “I sleep on the happiness tree.” Or it could be the Rams singing a fun little jingle in their huddle. Doesn’t matter: If you want the internet to make you smile, well, you’re welcome.